FAQ

What Do Drama Therapists Do?

Who Are Registered Drama Therapists (RDTs)?

Where Do Drama Therapists Practice?

What is the Listserve and How Do I Join?

Where Can I Get Articles and Books About Drama Therapy?

Can I Attend a Conference or Workshop?

What Do Drama Therapists Do?

A drama therapist first assesses a client's needs and then considers approaches that might best meet those needs. Drama therapy can take many forms depending on individual and group needs, skill and ability levels, interests, and therapeutic goals. Processes and techniques may include improvisation, theater games, storytelling, and enactment. Many drama therapists make use of text, performance, or ritual to enrich the therapeutic and creative process. The theoretical foundation of drama therapy lies in drama, theater, psychology, psychotherapy, anthropology, play, and interactive and creative processes.

Who Are Registered Drama Therapists?

A Registered Drama Therapist (RDT) is a Master’s level credential requiring coursework in psychology and drama therapy, experience in theater, and supervised internship and work experience. RDTs are board certified in the practice of drama therapy and follow the NADTA Code of Ethics.

The educational requirements for the RDT involve: A Master's or Doctoral degree in Drama Therapy from a program accredited by the National Association for Drama Therapy. OR  A Master's or Doctoral degree in theater or a mental health profession with additional in-depth training in drama therapy through NADTA's alternative training program. Board-certified registered drama therapists (RDT/BCT) train and supervise students in this alternative training program. Click here for more information about education to become a drama therapist.

Where Do Drama Therapists Practice?

Mental Health Facilities, Schools, Hospitals, Private Practice Settings, Substance Abuse Treatment Centers, Adult Day Care Centers, Correctional Facilities, Community Centers, After-school Programs, Shelters, Group Homes, Nursing Homes, Corporations, Theaters, Housing Projects, Medical Schools, Training Organizations.

Participants benefiting from drama therapy span the life spectrum. Client populations may include persons recovering from addiction, dysfunctional families, developmentally disabled persons, abuse survivors, prison inmates, homeless persons, people with AIDS, older adults, behavioral health consumers, at-risk youth, and the general public.

Click here for more information about careers in drama therapy.

What is the Listserve and How Do I Join?

Email lists or groups provide a way for people interested in a topic to send and receive emails to each other. After subscribing to a listserve, you are able to easily send one email or announcement to all other subscribers. This is a great resource for asking questions or sharing information with a wide group of people. Subscribers receive messages in their email boxes and if they choose to reply, can send it either to the whole list or to the individual.

The drama therapy listserve has hundreds of subscribers throughout North America and the world. These include professionals in the field, teachers, students, and people curious about drama therapy. The listserve is open to anyone except spammers, and it does have spam controls. The drama therapy listserve is not a part of NADTA, and NADTA takes no responsibility for the accuracy or screening of listserve postings.

You are welcome to join the listserve and post your questions or ideas for discussion, or you may want to observe the dialog.

Click here for instructions for joining the listserve.

Where Can I Get Articles and Books About Drama Therapy?

Most libraries and bookstores carry books on drama therapy. They can also be purchased on line at many web sites. Often you will find them listed under "Creative Arts Therapy" if there is not a section dedicated to drama therapy.

A current bibliography of books and articles on drama therapy can be found on the NADTA website under the "Resources" menu. Many publishers who put out drama therapy books can be accessed on our "Related Sites" link under the "Resources" menu.

If you are doing research for a school paper, your school library should be able to assist you with a database search for journal articles that relate to the topic of your paper.

Click here for current bibliographies of books, and journal articles on drama therapy.

Can I Attend a Conference or Workshop?

A good way to find out about drama therapy is to attend one of our national conferences. There you can see the work of drama therapists from across the US and internationally presenting many different types of drama therapy techniques used with different client populations. Conferences are open to the public and do not require previous exposure to drama therapy. You can also meet and network with professionals, talk with students about the schools they are attending, and go to workshops on such topics as alternative training, registry, and professional ethics. Watch our Events Page for information about the next conference.

If you are unable to attend a national conference, there may be regional conferences and workshops in your area. These will be listed on the Events Page as well.